Teaching

Alex contributes to the following University of Edinburgh undergraduate courses:

Year 4: Immunobiology of Malaria (course director and lecturer)

This is a popular elective course for Immunology Honours students which runs in semester 1 (September-December).  The course aims to provide an understanding of the immunological processes that occur in response to infection with malaria parasites.  Topics include development of immunity to malaria, immune evasion by malaria parasites, malaria pathogenesis and vaccine development. The emphasis is on human malaria, though animal models are also considered when appropriate to current hypotheses of immunity and/or pathogenesis.

Year 4: Immunology Project

The Rowe lab offers a four-month lab project for Immunology Honours students.

Year 4: Genetics of Host-Parasite Interactions (course lecturer)

This is an elective course for Genetics/Molecular Biology/Biotechnology Honours students in semester 1.  The course examines host-microbe interactions in malaria, trypanosomiasis and Listeria infection.  Alex’s lectures cover malaria parasite virulence genes, malaria pathogenesis and human malaria resistance genes.

Year 4: Genetics/Molecular Biology Project

The Rowe lab offers a four-month lab project for Genetics/Molecular Biology/Biotechnology Honours students.

Year 3: Parasite Biology (course lecturer)

This third year course aims to provide an understanding of the biological, molecular, genetic, immunological and epidemiological importance of protozoan and helminth parasites of medical and veterinary impact, including the host-parasite interaction and new strategies for parasite control via vaccination and drug therapy. Alex’s lectures cover the basic biology of malaria parasites, including why adhesion to host cells matters for infection and transmission of malaria parasites, and why adhesion to host cells matters for disease and pathogenesis. Practical classes co-organised with Dr Joanne Thompson involve microscopy to examine various malaria parasite life cycle stages, including the dramatic exflagellation of male gametes.